FINAL PROGRAM

DAY 1 – 07/JULY/2015 (TUESDAY)

Time Auditorium Room 1 Room 2 Room 3 Room 4
08:30 – 13:00 Satellite Events
Brazilian Society for Neuroscience and Behavior

FALAN Satellite Courses
Women in World Neuroscience
13:00 – 14:00 Lunch Break
14:00 – 16:00 Symposium 1
New perspectives on microglial cells as essential components of the CNS (Chair: Flavia Regina Souza Lima & Anna Xavier, UFRJ, Brazil)
Symposium 2
Brain diseases and neuroprotective strategies: experimental approaches and human studies (Chair: Diogo Onofre Souza, UFRGS, Brazil)
Symposium 3
fMRI population receptive field measurements and their applications to study brain plasticity and cognitive functions (Chair: Georgios Keliris, Max-Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Germany)
Symposium 4
|Cortical interneurons in development and disease (Chair: John Parnavelas, University College London, UK)
18:00 Opening Ceremony, Municipal Theatre of Rio de Janeiro

DAY 2 – 08/JULY/2015 (WEDNESDAY)

Time Auditorium Room 1 Room 2 Room 3 Room 4
08:30 – 10:00 Lecture 1 – Marian Joels, UMC Utrecht Brain Center, The Netherland – The stressed brain.
10:00 – 11:30 Posters* presentation (authors in place)
11:30 – 13:00 Mini-Symposium 1
Music as a window onto the brain (Sponsored by the Temporal Dynamics of Learning Center, an NSF-Sponsored Science of Learning Center; Chair: Gary Cottrell, UCSD, USA)
Mini-Symposium 2
Fondation Ipsen Prize 2015.
Genes, Synapses and Psychiatric Disorders
Mini-Symposium 3
TGF-beta signaling in neuronal development and degeneration (Chair: Masahisa Katsuno, Nagoya University, Japan)
Mini-Symposium 4
Beyond the gateway: bottom-up and top-down interactions in thalamus-cortex networks (Chair: Francisco Clascá, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Spain)
13:00 – 14:00 Lunch Break Special Feature:
The DANA Foundation Neuroethics Lecture.
Mysteries, myths and miracles. The cost and benefits of neuroscience. 
 – Colin Blakemore, University of London, UK.
14:00 – 16:00 Symposium 5
Glia and synapses: from development to synaptopathies (Chair: Jean-Pierre Mothet, Aix Marseille University, France)
Symposium 6
Circuit dynamics of the hippocampal-amygdala network and their alterations in stress and anxiety disorders (Marco Capogna, MRC Anatomical Neuropharmacology Unit, Oxford, UK)
Symposium 7
Novel strategies to elucidate function of neurotransmitter-gated ion channels (Chair: Cecilia Bouzat, IIBBB, Argentina)
Symposium 8
Presidential Symposium: Nanotools for neuroscience
(Chair: Pierre Magistretti, École Politechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland).
16:00 – 17:30 Posters presentation (authors in place)
17:30 – 19:00 Lecture 2 – Tobias Bonhoeffer, Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology, Martinsried, Germany. How experience changes the circuitry of the brain.
19:00 Assembléia SBNeC

DAY 3 – 09/JULY/2015 (THURSDAY)

Time Auditorium Room 1 Room 2 Room 3 Room 4
08:30 – 10:00 Lecture 3 – Karen Duff, Columbia University, NY, USA.
– Propagation of Pathology in Alzheimer’s Disease: Neuroanatomical Considerations, Mechanistic Insights and Therapeutic Potencial
10:00 – 11:30 Posters presentation (authors in place)
11:30 – 13:00 Mini-Symposium 5
Frontiers in endocannabinoid signaling (Chair: Fabricio Pamplona, Instituto D’Or, Brazil)
Mini-Symposium 6
Noradrenergic regulation of memory reconsolidation: Neural mechanisms and therapeutic targets (Chair: Martine Ammassari-Teule, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Italy.)
Mini-Symposium 7
Temporal organization of perception and action (Chair: André Cravo, UFABC, Brazil)
Mini-Symposium 8
Neuroimmune interactions in health and disease (Chair: Wilson Savino, FIOCRUZ, Brazil)
13:00 – 14:00 Lunch Break
14:00 – 16:00 Symposium 9
Evolution of cerebral cortical development (Chair: Zoltan Molnar, University of Oxford, UK)
Symposium 10
Novel mechanisms of cellular and memory failure in Alzheimer’s disease (Chair: Marco Prado, Robarts Institute, Canada)
Symposium 11
Emotional memory: neural basis in animals and humans (Chair: M. Beatrice Passani, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Italy)
Symposium 12
The art of forging neurons: programming and reprogramming the brain (Chair: Paola Arlotta, Harvard University, USA)Support:
16:00 – 17:30 Posters presentation (authors in place)
17:30 – 19:00 Lecture 4 – Xu Zhang, Institute of Neuroscience, Shanghai, China. Somatosensory neurons: types and mechanisms for pain modulation.

DAY 4 – 10/JULY/2015 (FRIDAY)

Time Auditorium Room 1 Room 2 Room 3 Room 4
08:30 – 10:00 Lecture 5 – Okihide Hikosaka, NIH-NEI, USA. Parallel basal ganglia circuits for voluntary and automatic behavior
(Torsten Wiesel Lecture).
.
10:00 – 11:30 Posters presentation (authors in place)
11:30 – 13:00 Mini-Symposium 9
Coffee break – re-wiring and re-balancing the brain with caffeine (Chair: Lisiane Porciuncula, UFRGS, Brazil)
Mini-Symposium 10
The role of the basal ganglia in action-selection (Chair: Donita Robinson, University of North Carolina, USA)
Mini-Symposium 11
Alumni mini-symposium: Neurodegeneration and Neural repair (Chair: Susan Sara, Collége de France)
Mini-Symposium 12
Ionic transporters in microglia, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes: potential therapeutic targets for stroke (Chair: Lucio Annunziato, University of Naples, Italy & Marc Simard, University of Maryland, USA)
13:00 – 14:00 Lunch Break
14:00 – 16:00 Symposium 13
The “ultimate synapse”. Advances in neuromuscular junction development, structure and function (Chair: Osvaldo Uchitel, IFIBYNE, Argentina)
Symposium 14
Cortical Plasticity Following Sensory Loss and Restoration (Chair: Stephen G. Lomber, University of Western Ontario, Canada)
Symposium 15
Vesicular transporters: From molecular function to behavior and disease (Chair: Salah El Mestikawy, McGill University, Canada)
Symposium 16
Lessons in brain structure, function and behavior from animal diversity (Chair: Suzana Herculano-Houzel, UFRJ, Brazil)
16:00 – 17:30 Posters presentation (authors in place)
17:30 – 19:00 Lecture 6 – Ryoichiro Kageyama, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, Japan. Molecular control of neural stem cells.

DAY 5 – 11/JULY/2015 (SATURDAY)

Time Auditorium Room 1 Room 2 Room 3 Room 4
08:30 – 10:00 Lecture 7 – Terry Sejnowski, Salk Institute, La Jolla, USA. Learning how to learn.
IS CANCELED
10:00 – 11:30 Posters presentation (authors in place)
11:30 – 13:00 Mini-Symposium 13 – Sleep and Memory (Chair: Sidarta Ribeiro, UFRN, Brazil) Mini-Symposium 14 – Mechanisms of network synchronization and hyperexcitability (Chair: Merab Kokaia, Lund University, Sweden) Mini-Symposium 15 – Glucocorticoid Hormones and the Regulation of Memory in Health and Disease: from Animal Models to Clinical Practice (Chair: Raquel Fornari, UFABC, Brazil) Mini-Symposium 16 – Sex-steroid hormones and cognition (Chair: Grace Pereira, UFMG, Brazil & Karyn Frick, University of Wisconsin, USA)
13:00 – 14:00 Lunch Break
14:00 – 16:00 Symposium 17 – Adult neurogenesis: from circuit to function (Chair: Maithe Arruda-Carvalho, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, USA) Symposium 18 – Risk factors contributing to dopamine neuron degeneration and progression (Chair: Micaela Morelli, University of Cagliari, Italy) Symposium 19 – Should I stay, should I go: role of basal ganglia in control of drug addiction and food intake (Chair: Karina Abrahão, NIH, USA & Tatiana Ferreira, UFABC, Brazil) Symposium 20 – Computational Approaches to Understanding the Brain (Chair: Erik De Schutter, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, Japan)
16:00 – 17:30 Lecture 8 – Brian MacVicar, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada – Neuron-glia communication to maintain a healthy brain.
17:30 Closing Session and Awards

 

*”Posters” refer to the period when the first author should be present.

LECTURES:

Marian Joels, UMC Utrecht Brain Center, The Netherlands – The stressed brain.
Okihide Hikosaka, NIH-NEI, USA – Parallel basal ganglia circuits for voluntary and automatic behavior (Torsten Wiesel Lecture).
Ryoichiro Kageyama, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, Japan – Molecular control of neural stem cells.
Tobias Bonhoeffer, Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology, Martinsried, Germany – How experience changes the circuitry of the brain.
Xu Zhang, Institute of Neuroscience, Shanghai, China – Somatosensory neurons: types and mechanisms for pain modulation.
Terry Sejnowski, Salk Institute, La Jolla, USA – Learning how to learn.
Brian MacVicar, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada – Neuron-glia communication to maintain a healthy brain.
Karen Duff, Columbia University, NY, USA. – Propagation of Pathology in Alzheimer’s Disease: Neuroanatomical Considerations, Mechanistic Insights and Therapeutic Potencial
Special Feature: Colin Blakemore, University of London, UK – Mysteries, myths and miracles. The cost and benefits of neuroscience (Dana Foundation Lecture on Neuroethics)

SYMPOSIA

Symposium 1 – New perspectives on microglial cells as essential components of the CNS (Chair: Flavia Regina Souza Lima & Anna Xavier, UFRJ, Brazil) – July 7, Room 1, 14:00-16:00

• Michel Mallat, INSERM, France – Recruitment and functions of microglia in the developing cerebral cortex.
• Rommy Von Bernhardi, PUC, Chile – Aged microglia: of receptors and functional changes, and their deleterious effects in neurodegenerative diseases.
• Axel Nimmerjahn, Salk Institute La Jolla, USA – Microglia and the CNS inflammatory response to viral gene transfer.
• José Luis Marín-Teva, Universidad de Granada, Spain – Role of microglia in neuronal cell death during retinal development

Symposium 2 – Brain diseases and neuroprotective strategies: experimental approaches and human studies (Chair: Diogo Onofre Souza, UFRGS, Brazil) – July 7, Room 2, 14:00-16:00

• Luc Pellerin, Université de Lausanne, Switzerland – Neuroenergetics: regulation and roles of monocarboxylate transporters.
• Marcelo Dietrich, Yale University – A role for hypothalamic circuits in neuropsychiatric disorders.
• Carla Inês Tasca, UFSC, Brazil – Guanosine controls inflammatory pathways to afford neuroprotection.
• Douglas Smith, UPenn, USA – How the Brain Breaks in Traumatic Brain Injury.

Symposium 3 – fMRI population receptive field measurements and their applications to study brain plasticity and cognitive functions (Chair: Georgios Keliris, Max-Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Germany) – July 7, Room 3, 14:00-16:00

• Serge Dumoulin, Utrecht University, The Netherlands – Population receptive field reconstruction: neural mechanisms of visual perception and cognition.
• Paola Binda, Pisa Vision Lab, Italy – Population receptive fields in early visual areas: mapping of retinotopic space vs. representation of contextual information.
• Georgios Keliris, Max-Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Germany – fMRI responses to dynamic checkerboards reveal average single neuron receptive fields in early visual cortex.
• Stelios Smirnakis, Baylor College of Medicine, USA – Population receptive field measurements in patients with homonymous visual field defects.

Symposium 4 – Cortical interneurons in development and disease (Chair: John Parnavelas, University College London, UK) – July 7, Room 4, 14:00-16:00

• Geraldine Zimmer, Institute for Human Genetics, Germany – Post-mitotic control of cortical interneuron development.
• John Parnavelas, University College London, UK – Molecular mechanisms involved in the migration of cortical interneurons.
• Gord Fishell, NYU, USA – Sensory inputs control the integration of neurogliaform interneurons into cortical circuits.
• Maria-Elisa Calcagnotto, UFRGS, Brazil – Role of interneurons in epileptogenesis.

Symposium 5 – Glia and synapses: from development to synaptopathies (Chair: Jean-Pierre Mothet, Aix Marseille University, France) – July 8, Room 1, 14:00-16:00

• Vladimir Parpura, University of Alabama, USA – Exocytotic release of glutamate from astrocytes in heath and disease.
• Flavia Gomes, UFRJ, Brazil – Astrocytes control of inhibitory and excitatory synapse formation in the cerebral cortex.
• Jean-Pierre Mothet, Aix Marseille University, France – Glial D-serine tunes neurotransmission systems interplay and cognitive functions in the prefrontal cortex.
• Michela Matteoli, University of Milan, Italy – Glia-derived immune molecules and synaptic function.

Symposium 6 – Circuit dynamics of the hippocampal-amygdala network and their alterations in stress and anxiety disorders (Marco Capogna, MRC Anatomical Neuropharmacology Unit, Oxford, UK) – July 8, Room 2, 14:00-16:00

• Marco Capogna, MRC Anatomical Neuropharmacology Unit, Oxford, UK – The key role of GABAergic neurons in the hippocampal-amygdala network.
• Francesco Ferraguti, Innsbruck Medical University, Austria – The intercalated cell masses as a relay station for hippocampal and somatosensory inputs to the amygdala: implications for fear learning.
• Sumantra Chattarji, NCBS, Bangalore, India – Contrasting effects of stress on the amygdala versus hippocampus: from neuronal plasticity to network interactions.
• Daniela Kaufer, University of California, Berkeley, USA – Hippocampal-amygdala circuit dynamics in functional regulation of adult neurogenesis.

Symposium 7 – Novel strategies to elucidate function of neurotransmitter-gated ion channels (Chair: Cecilia Bouzat, IIBBB, Argentina – July 8, Room 3, 14:00-16:00

• Cynthia Czajkowski, University of Wisconsin, USA. – Uncovering ligand-driven motions in pentameric ligand-gated ion channels.
• Ana Belen Elgoyhen, INGEBI, Conicet, Argentina. – Molecular evolution of cochlear cholinergic nicotinic receptors.
• Cecilia Bouzat, IIBBB, Argentina – Deciphering molecular bases of function and drug modulation of Nicotinic Receptors.
• Andrew Plested, Charity University Berlin, Germany – Glutamate Receptor Activation Mechanisms. 

Symposium 8 – Presidential Symposium – Nanotools for neuroscience (Chair: Pierre Magistretti – IBRO President) – July 8, Room 4, 14:00-16:00
• Michael Roukes (California Institute of Technology): Toward Functional Connectomics: A Convergence of Neuro & Nano
• Silvia Guterres (Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil) – Soft nanocarriers as efficient shuttles to deliver drugs to the brain tissue
• Luis Alberto Carrillo Reid (Columbia University, USA): Imprinting and recalling cortical ensembles with two-photon optogenetics in vivo.
• Viviana Gradinaru ((California Institute of Technology): Visualizing the Activity and Anatomy of Brain Circuits: Optogenetic Sensors, Actuators, and Tissue Clearing Approaches.

Symposium 9 – Evolution of cerebral cortical development (Chair: Zoltan Molnar, University of Oxford, UK) – July 9, Room 1, 14:00-16:00
• Roberto Lent, UFRJ, Brazil – Long-distance plasticity: a source of connectome diversity?
• Tatsumi Hirata, National Instituteof Genetics, Shizouka, Japan – Evolutionary conservation of neocortical neurogenetic program in the mammals and birds.
• Jon Kaas, Vanderbilt University, USA – Origins of mammalian cerebral cortex.
• Ed Lein, Allen Brain Research Institute, USA – Transcriptional architecture of the primate neocortex.

Symposium 10 – Novel mechanisms of cellular and memory failure in Alzheimer’s disease (Chair: Marco Prado, Robarts Institute, Canada) – July 9, Room 2, 14:00-16:00

• Marco Prado, Robarts Institute, Canada – Chaperoning toxicity in Alzheimer’s disease.
• Hermona Soreq, Hebrew University, Israel – RNA metabolism impairments in Alzheimer’s disease: From exon inclusion to mis-regulated non-coding RNA.
• Eric Klann, NYU, USA – Stress-induced Dysregulation of Translation in Alzheimer’s Disease.
• Lisa Saksida, University of Cambridge, UK – Cognition and Behaviour in Models of Alzheimer’s Disease.

Symposium 11 – Emotional memory: neural basis in animals and humans (Chair: M. Beatrice Passani, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Italy) – July 9, Room 3, 14:00-16:00

• Ivan Izquierdo, PUC-RS, Brazil – How to enhance extinction: Synaptic tagging and vagal stimulation.
• Mohammed Milad, Harvard University, USA – Abnormality in the neurobiology of fear extinction across anxiety disorders.
• Beatrice Passani, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Italy – Brain histamine and aversive memories.
• Elizabeth Phelps, NYU, USA –  Changing Fear.

Symposium 12 – The art of forging neurons: programming and reprogramming the brain (Chair: Paola Arlotta, Harvard University, USA) – July 9, Room 4, 14:00-16:00

• Paola Arlotta, Harvard University, USA – A “white” matter of identity: programming neurons to change glia.
• Federico Calegari, Center for Regenerative Therapies, Dresden, Germany – In vivo control of mammalian neurogenesis.
• Benedikt Berninger, University of Mainz, Germany – New interneurons for the brain.
• Marcos Costa, UFRN, Brazil – Reprogramming of discrete astroglial populations into definite neuronal subtypes.

Support:

Symposium 13 – The “ultimate synapse”. Advances in neuromuscular junction development, structure and function (Chair: Osvaldo Uchitel, IFIBYNE, Argentina) – July 10, Room 1, 14:00-16:00

• Uel Jackson McMahan, Texas A&M University, USA – Imaging Macromolecules that Regulate Synaptic Transmission.
• Rafael Fernández-Chacón, Universidad de Sevilla, Spain – Presynaptic dysfunction at the synaptic vesicle cycle and neurodegeneration.
• Cristina Guatimosim Fonseca, UFMG, Brazil – Neuromuscular dysfunction in BACHD mouse model for Huntington´s disease.
• Wesley Thompson, University of Texas, Aistin, USA – Schwann cells participate in synapse elimination at the developing neuromuscular junction.

Symposium 14 – Cortical Plasticity Following Sensory Loss and Restoration (Chair: Stephen G. Lomber, University of Western Ontario, Canada) – July 10, Room 2, 14:00-16:00

• Stephen G. Lomber, University of Western Ontario, Canada – Auditory cortex mediates enhanced visual cognition in the congenitally deaf.
• Pascal Barone, CNRS CERCO UMR 5549, Toulouse, France – Impact of crossmodal reorganization on auditory recovery after cochlear implantation in adult deafness.
• Brigitte Roeder, University of Hamburg, Germany – Neural correlates of functional recovery in humans with a history of visual deprivation from birth.
• Amir Amedi, Hebrew University, Israel – The neural correlates of hearing colors: insight from darkness on brain plasticity and stability.

Symposium 15 – Vesicular transporters: From molecular function to behavior and disease (Chair: Salah El Mestikawy, McGill University, Canada) – July 10, Room 3, 14:00-16:00

• Robert Edward, UCSF, USA – The Regulation of Vesicular Glutamate Transport.
• Christian Rosenmund, La Charité University, Berlin, Germany – Regulation of vesicle release probability by VGLUT function.
• Vania Prado, University of Western Ontario, Canada – Molecular and behavioral signatures of cholinergic deficiency.
• Salah El Mestikawy, McGill University, Canada – Glutamate-cotransmission VGLUT3 and neuropathologies.

Symposium 16 – Lessons in brain structure, function and behavior from animal diversity (Chair: Suzana Herculano-Houzel, UFRJ, Brazil) – July 10, Room 4, 14:00-16:00

• Suzana Herculano-Houzel, UFRJ, Brazil – Brain structure diversity in evolution: what changes, what doesn’t, and what does it matter?
• Andrew Iwaniuk, University of Lethbridge, Canada – Cognition without wrinkles: brain-behaviour relationships in birds.
• Ken Catania, Vanderbilt University, USA – Clues from specialized species on the structure, function and evolution of somatosensory systems.
• Paul Manger, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa – Evolution of the biggest brains – how does this happen and why?

Symposium 17 – Adult neurogenesis: from circuit to function (Chair: Maithe Arruda-Carvalho, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, USA) – July 11, Room 1, 14:00-16:00

• Mazen Kheirbek, Columbia University, USA – Real-time visualization and control of adult born granule cells in memory encoding.
• Amelia Eisch, University of Texas Southwestern, USA – New neurons in adult brains: implications for psychiatric disorders.
• Paul Frankland, Hospital for Sick Children, Canada – Hippocampal neurogenesis and forgetting.
• Alejandro Schinder, Instituto Leloir, Argentina – Adult neurogenesis and information processing in the hippocampus.

Symposium 18 – Risk factors contributing to dopamine neuron degeneration and progression (Chair: Micaela Morelli, University of Cagliari, Italy) – July 11, Room 2, 14:00-16:00

• Elaine Del Bel, University of São Paulo, Brazil – Chronic L-DOPA administration in the hemiparkinsonian rat: role for a neuroinflammatory reaction?
• María-Trinidad Herrero Ezquerro, Universidad Jaume I, Spain – Role of microglial motility and gliapse in  phagocytosis of degenerating dopaminergic neurons.
• Micaela Morelli, University of Cagliari, Italy – Amphetamine-related drugs induce neuroinflammation and dopamine neuron degeneration: role of age.
• Mario Herrera-Marschitz, ICBM, Chile – Perinatal asphyxia induces apoptotic-like cell death, overactivation of sentinel proteins, pro inflammatory signalling and delayed dopaminergic deficits: prevention by neonatal nicotinamide treatment.

Symposium 19 – Should I stay, should I go: role of basal ganglia in control of drug addiction and food intake (Chair: Karina Abrahão, NIH, USA & Tatiana Ferreira, UFABC, Brazil) – July 11, Room 3, 14:00-16:00

• Tatiana Ferreira, UFABC, Brazil – Introduction
• Barry Everitt, Cambridge University, UK – Neural mechanisms underlying drug seeking habits.
• David Lovinger, NIH, USA – Role of the Striatum in Habitual Alcohol Seeking.
• Ivan de Araujo , Yale University, USA – Metabolic sensing in basal ganglia circuits.

Symposium 20 – Computational Approaches to Understanding the Brain (Chair: Erik De Schutter, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, Japan) – July 11, Room 4, 14:00-16:00

• Erik De Schutter, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, Japan – Stochastic effects at neuron molecular and cellular levels.
• Sean Hill, École Fédérale Polytechnique de Lausanne, Switzerland – Emergent structural and functional properties of a cortical microcircuit.
• Anna Levina, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Germany – Interaction of synaptic plasticities in balanced networks.
• Antonio Carlos Roque, São Paulo University, Brazil – Models for rodent exploratory behavior.

 MINI-SYMPOSIA

Mini-Symposium 1 – Music as a window onto the brain (Sponsored by the Temporal Dynamics of Learning Center, an NSF-Sponsored Science of Learning Center; Chair: Gary Cottrell, UCSD, USA) – July 8, Room 1, 11:30-13:00

• Fredrik Ullén, Karolinska Institute, Sweden – The neurobiology of musical expertise – from neuroimaging to behavior genetics.
• Dana Strait, University of Maryland & Nina Kraus, Northwestern University, USA – Biological impact of music training across the life span: cross-sectional and longitudinal evidence.
• Edward Large, UConn, USA – Neurodynamics of Music Perception.

Mini-Symposium 2 -Fondation Ipsen Prize 2015  – Genes, Synapses and Psychiatric Disorders – July 8, Room 2, 11:30-13:00

• Mark Bear, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA – A path from synaptic pathophysiology to treatment of genetically defined psychiatric disorders.
• David Porteous, University of Edinburgh, UK – Making genetic sense of psychiatric disorders – DISC1 and other insights.
• Thomas Bourgeron, Institut Pasteur, France – From genetic architecture to synaptic plasticity in autism spectrum disorders.

Mini-Symposium 3 – TGF-beta signaling in neuronal development and degeneration (Chair: Masahisa Katsuno, Nagoya University, Japan) – July 8, Room 3, 11:30-13:00

• Ernst R. Tamm, University of Regensburg, Germany – TGF-beta: Friend and foe in the retina.
• Edith Hamel, McGill University, Canada – TGF-beta in the cerebrovascular alterations and increased susceptibility to neuronal failure.
• Masahisa Katsuno, Nagoya University, Japan – Disruption of TGF-beta signaling in motor neuron diseases.
• Guy S Bewick, University of Aberdeen, UK – TGF-betas as modulators of synaptic transmission.

Mini-Symposium 4 – Beyond the gateway: bottom-up and top-down interactions in thalamus-cortex networks (Chair: Francisco Clascá, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Spain) – July 8, Room 4, 11:30-13:00

• László Acsády, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Hungary – The building blocks of the thalamus.
• Murray Sherman, University of Chicago, USA – Thalamus Plays a Central Role in Cortical Functioning.
• Francisco Clasca, Universidad  Autonoma University de Madrid, Spain – Thalamocortical circuits for perception, cognition and action.
• Sérgio Neuenschwander, UFRN, Brazil – Timing matters in the retino-thalamocortical system.

Mini-Symposium 5 – Frontiers in endocannabinoid signaling (Chair: Fabricio Pamplona, Instituto D’Or, Brazil) – July 9, Room 1, 11:30 -13:00

• Ricardo Reis, IBCCF, UFRJ, Brazil, Cannabinoid receptor signaling and its role in neurogenesis and oligodendrogenesis: a role for hemopressin.
• Giovanni Marsicano, INSERM Université Bordeaux, France – Different modes of actions, functions and regulation of CB1 receptor signaling in the brain.
• Fabricio Moreira, ICB, UFMG, Brazil. Cannabidiol and endocannabinoid hydrolysis inhibitors: Pharmacological strategies to alleviate seizure and neurotoxicity.
• Fabricio Pamplona, Instituto D’Or, Brazil – Endogenous CB1 allosteric enhancer balances age-related cognitive alterations.

Mini-Symposium 6 –Noradrenergic regulation of memory reconsolidation: Neural mechanisms and therapeutic targets (Chair: Martine Ammassari-Teule, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Italy.) – July 9, Room 2, 11:30-13:00

• Susan J. Sara, Collège de France, France – Learning-dependent plasticity of noradrenergic neurons and modulation of reactivated memory.
• Leandro J. Bertoglio, UFSC, Brazil – Applicability of inducing a dysfunctional fear memory through enhanced noradrenergic activity to investigate a combined pharmacological intervention targeting its reconsolidation.
• Martine Ammassari-Teule, CNR, Italy – Reactivating fear memory under propranolol resets pre-trauma levels of dendritic spines in basolateral amygdala but not dorsal hippocampus neurons.
• Jacek Debiec, University of Michigan, USA – Memory reconsolidation processes and posttraumatic stress disorder: promises and challenges of translational research.

Mini-Symposium 7 – Temporal organization of perception and action (Chair: André Cravo, UFABC, Brazil) – July 9, Room 3, 11:30-13:00

• Dean Buonomano, UCLA, USA – How does the brain tell time?
• Andre M. Cravo, UFABC, Brazil – Learning temporal relations between events.
• Anna C. (Kia) Nobre, University of Oxford, UK – How do temporal expectations change perception?
• Charles Schroeder, Nathan Kline Institute, USA – How are temporal expectations enacted at local circuit and brain network levels?

Mini-Symposium 8 – Neuroimmune interactions in health and disease (Chair: Wilson Savino, FIOCRUZ, Brazil) – July 9, Room 4, 11:30-13:00

• Adriana del Rey, University of Marburg, Germany – Brain-borne cytokine network regulates long-term potentiation and learning.
• Keith Kelley, University of Illnois Urbana-Champaign, USA – Inflammation and behavior.
• Sarah Spencer, RMIT University Melbourne, Australia – Perinatal nutrition programs neuroimmune function.
• Luis Barbeito, Instituto Pasteur Montevideo, Uruguay – Macrophages and aberrant astrocytes in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

Mini-Symposium 9 – Coffee break – re-wiring and re-balancing the brain with caffeine (Chair: Lisiane Porciuncula, UFRGS, Brazil) – July 10, Room 1, 11:30-13:00

• Christophe Bernard, Aix-Marseille Université, France – Deleterious consequences of caffeine consumption during pregnancy.
• Jiang-Fan Chen, Boston University, USA – Caffeine, adenosine receptors and Parkinson’s disease: distinct cellular mechanisms and multiple benefits.
• Rodrigo Cunha, Universidade de Coimbra, Portugal – Caffeine re-balances mood and memory dysfunction by antagonizing adenosine A2A receptors controlling aberrant synaptic plasticity.

Mini-Symposium 10 – The role of the basal ganglia in action-selection (Chair: Donita Robinson, University of North Carolina, USA) – July 10, Room 2, 11:30-13:00

• Peter Redgrave, University of Sheffield, UK – The basal ganglia: a functional architecture configured for selection and reinforcement.
• Claudio da Cunha, UFPR, Brazil – Evidence for body-part-go cells in the mice dorsolateral striatum.
• Phil Baker, University of Washington – Midbrain-striatal neurocircuitry encodes context-dependent reward, movement, and spatial information.
• Saleem Nicola, AECOM, USA – Ventral striatum selects proximate rewards.

Mini-Symposium 11 – Alumni mini-symposium: Neurodegeneration and Neural repair (Chair: Susan Sara, Collége de France) – July 10, Room 3, 11:30-13:00

• Rufus Akinyemi, Federal Medical Centre Abeokuta, Nigeria – Neurodegeneration and post-stroke vascular cognitive impairment.
• Anna Letizia Allegra Mascaro, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Italy – Single branch axotomy induces GAP-43 dependent regrowth and synaptic remodelling of cerebellar climbing fibers in vivo.
• Bettina Scwab, Universiteit Twente, The Netherlands – Synchronization of the Parkinsonian Globus Pallidus by Neural Gap Junctions.
• Jitendra Kumar Sinha, National Institute of Nutrition, India – Oxidative stress links obesity and brain ageing in health and disease.

Mini-Symposium 12 – Ionic transporters in microglia, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes: potential therapeutic targets for stroke (Chair: Lucio Annunziato, University of Naples, Italy & Marc Simard, University of Maryland, USA) – July 10, Room 4, 11:30-13:00

• Alexej Verkhratsky, University of Manchester, UK – Sodium signalling in astroglia: role for ion channels and transporters.
• Lucio Annunziato, University of Naples, Italy – NCX expression and activity in microglia and oligodentrocytes in neurodegenerative diseases.
• Sun Dandan, University of Pittsburgh, USA – Microglia Activation in Neurodegenerative Disorders Depends on NHE-mediated H+ Homeostasis.
• Marc Simard, University of Maryland, USA – The Sur1-Trpm4 channel in glial cells in CNS injury.

Mini-Symposium 13 – Sleep and Memory (Chair: Sidarta Ribeiro, UFRN, Brazil) – July 11, Room 1, 11:30-13:00

• Jan Born, University of Tuebingen, Germany – Sleep-dependent system consolidation.
• Martín Cammarota, UFRN, Brazil – Variations on the persistence of memory.
• Jessica Payne, Sleep, Notre Dame University, USA – Sleep, stress interactions in emotional memory consolidation.

Mini-Symposium 14 – Mechanisms of network synchronization and hyperexcitability (Chair: Merab Kokaia, Lund University, Sweden) – July 11, Room 2, 11:30-13:00

• Karl Deisseroth, Stanford University – Optogenetics in normal and diseased brain. • Dimitri Kullmann, University College London, UK – Shining light on gamma oscillations.
• John Huguenard, Stanford University – Thalamo-cortical circuits and synchronized activity.
• Merab Kokaia, Lund University, Sweden – Interneurons in synchronized activity and its termination.

Mini-Symposium 15 – Glucocorticoid Hormones and the Regulation of Memory in Health and Disease: from Animal Models to Clinical Practice (Chair: Raquel Fornari, UFABC, Brazil) – July 11, Room 3, 11:30-13:00

• Benno Roozendaal, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands – Rapid glucocorticoid actions on memory: involvement of the endocannabinoid system.
• Gina Quirarte, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México – Glucocorticoids in the striatum modulate the consolidation of emotional memory.
• VanjaVukojevic, da University of Basel, Switzerland – (Epi)genetic differences in  glucocorticoid signaling and human memory.
• Gustav Schelling, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Germany – The Role of Glucocorticoids, Catecholamines and Endocannabinoids in the Development of Traumatic Memories and Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms in Survivors of Critical Illness.

Mini-Symposium 16 – Sex-steroid hormones and cognition (Chair: Grace Pereira, UFMG, Brazil & Karyn Frick, University of Wisconsin, USA) – July 11, Room 4, 11:30-13:00

• Karyn Frick, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA – Rapid effects of estradiol on memory consolidation.
• Luke Remage-Healey, University of Massachusetts, USA – The role of brain estrogen production in learning, sensory representations, and sensorimotor integration.
• Grace Pereira, UFMG, Brazil – Estradiol as a cognitive enhancer: molecular mechanisms and interactions with the cholinergic system.